Tag Archives: Coping

Watch What You Think. Change What You Get.

Photo Credit: Wendy Pitts Reeves

“Look at that – there’s three of ‘em!”

Rhegina exclaimed as she bent down to pick up something shiny at her feet. Right there on the sidewalk. In plain view. On this perfectly ordinary Thursday morning.

Three shiny new pennies.

One for each of us. :)

Two friends and I were walking into a mastermind retreat with other entrepreneurs, and our senses were already on high alert. New strategies. Revamped goals. Clearer intentions.

Abundant mindsets.

So of course we picked them up, with a laugh and sense of celebration – because we knew what those little pennies meant.

Sparkling in the early morning sun, they were a wink from the Universe, a tiny gift to let us know that we were seen, that life was good, that money was literally everywhere…

if we looked.

That might seem silly, and yet – managing our energy is one of the most powerful tools we have as entrepreneurs. So what we see, how we feel, and what we notice matters.

Here’s why.
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How to Shift Bad Energy (& Get What You Want)

Photo Credit: Mathias Ripp on Flickr

“I’m sorry, but you’ll have to buy another ticket.”

Are you kidding? I asked, incredulous.

My plane was still there, on the tarmac. I was here, suitcase in tow. Why couldn’t I board?

I was headed home after two weeks overseas. I’d had a wonderful trip, even better than expected. I couldn’t believe how well things went the entire time.

And now this?!

I’m pretty detail-oriented, so I’d done my homework for this adventure. I knew almost exactly what to expect, and what I didn’t know, I figured out. Everything turned out beautifully.

But apparently I’d missed one key fact: for international flights, one had to be at the airport not two, but three hours early. So when I arrived at 9:30 sharp for my 11:30 flight, that wasn’t good enough.

The neatly attired woman behind the counter had little sympathy for a foolish American who couldn’t follow instructions. Her shift was almost up, and she was ready to go. “You’ll have to buy another ticket”, she said with an irritated sigh.

Buy a one-way, international ticket on the very day I needed to fly? I was looking at almost $1,000 out of pocket on the spot.

So I didn’t feel particularly friendly either.
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How to Handle Criticism – and Protect Your Confidence

Photo Credit: Eugene Zemlyanskiy on Flickr

She’d been fired.

When I read my client’s update, I winced. She’d lost her biggest account, and it hurt – both her intended budget for the year, and her heart.

She was a professional, so she took it in stride. But she felt awful, and I knew it.

There could be any number of reasons why her client quit, and we reviewed several. Perhaps she wasn’t clear enough about her expectations. Perhaps she went a little too fast. Perhaps they didn’t understand the real value of what she did for them.

Perhaps she was just a little ‘too much’, a little too intense. 

Boy, could I relate.

I, too, have often been told I was “too intense”. Continue reading

How to Cope When You (Really) Screw Up

Photo Credit – greg westfall on Flickr

I never saw her again.

And although I no longer remember her name, I’ve never forgotten her.

I’d only been in private practice for a little while, though I’d worked in mental health for a long time. Back then, I did a lot of counseling around trauma, abuse and domestic violence.

I already had a ton of experience; (I thought) I knew what I was doing.

One evening, at the end of a long day, I did an initial consult with a woman who’d finally gathered her nerve to seek help. She was living with severe domestic violence, married to a man who sounded like he could kill her one day if she didn’t get out.

I was immensely proud of her for having the courage to come in, and I understood her situation immediately. After hearing her story, I felt crystal clear on the level of danger she was in. I knew what she needed to do to get out.

So I laid it all out for her.

With the kind of excitement that comes with clarity, I explained how to put a safety plan in place, what to say to him (and what not to), how to handle her employer, how to seek legal help, how to move out, all of it.

She listened politely as I gave her every idea I could think of. Then she thanked me, and left. I felt great — I knew I could help her!

But she never came back.

To this day, I don’t know what happened. It may be that she found a way out, that she went to another counselor, that she was just fine. I certainly hope so.

But I think I made a mistake that night – and it was a big one.
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How One Daily Habit Helps Sustain Your Success

I wasn’t at all sure I could still do this.

A friend invited me to join her for an overnight hike to LeConte Lodge, a roundtrip of roughly eleven miles to the top of Mt. LeConte in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

It was a very steep, straight up (and straight down), kind of hike. And I hadn’t done anything like that in a very long time.

But I had no intention of missing this opportunity.  So of course I said a big, happy yes.

And then, on the day of the hike, it rained.

And rained.

And rained.

It rained so hard the creeks overflowed, and new waterfalls were born where none had been before. There were times when I felt like I was hiking through a car wash, with a 1,000 foot drop-off at my side.  

And there were times when it was immensely beautiful, with water dancing off the rocks and mist in the trees.

So I slogged along in my own wet little world, tucked under rain gear, singing every rain song I could think of. (Raindrops keep fallin’ on my head…)

I tried not to think about how soggy my boots were, how hard it was to breathe, or how much farther I had to climb.

It was steep. Messy.

Intense.

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